Mining and Resistance in Dinétah
24:23

Mining and Resistance in Dinétah

A special episode-length documentary filmed on location in Dinétah; the name of the land of the Navajo people, spanning parts of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah. 21 Billion tons of coal, the largest deposit in the US with an estimated value of 100 billion dollars, lay untouched in Dinétah until 1966. In that year, Peabody Coal Company leased the land in an agreement with a Hopi tribal council they helped form. In 1974, Congress passed the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act, commonly known as “the relocation law." It divided about 2 million acres of land previously shared between Diné and Hopi tribes. Nearly overnight, the homes of tens of thousands of Diné and several hundred Hopi were now illegal. Since then, an estimated 10,000 to 20,000 Diné people have been forcibly relocated. Today, only a small group of mostly elder Diné continue to live here, and those that remain are being pressured to leave. More than 40% of homes here lack running water. Peabody Energy’s two mines here have extracted over 400 million tons of coal and depleted 70 percent of an ancient desert aquifer. Peabody’s Kayenta coal mine fuels the Navajo Generating Station, which is owned by the US Department of the Interior and provides water and electricity to Phoenix, Tucson, Las Vegas and Los Angeles. What is the cost, paid in the lives of the Navajo people, of the water and power delivered to these cities? On the anniversary of the founding of the United States, we visit with Diné (Navajo) youth and elders coming together to fight for the survival of their culture, fighting against displacement caused by US government policy, as well as exploitation caused by mining and other polluting industries.
Dakota Access: Standing Rock protesters tell of violent arrests and police abuse
08:36

Dakota Access: Standing Rock protesters tell of violent arrests and police abuse

The Native American women leading the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline say they have faced police abuse and mistreatment in jail. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://is.gd/subscribeguardian North Dakota’s militarized law enforcement has left many of them traumatized. ‘They came with their guns, their weapons and violence and put it on a peaceful people,’ says Lauren Howland, a member of the San Carlos and Jicarilla Apache tribes and Navajo Nation. The Guardian ► https://www.theguardian.com Suggested videos: Desert Fire ► http://bit.ly/DesertFire Anywhere but Washington ► http://bit.ly/ABWNevada US veterans on life after the Iraq war ► http://bit.ly/SeanSmithVets 6x9: experience solitary confinement ► http://bit.ly/6x9gdn Gun Nation ► http://bit.ly/GunNationDoc We Walk Together ► http://bit.ly/WeWalkTogetherFilm The last job on Earth ► http://bit.ly/LastJobOnEarth Patrick Stewart: the ECHR and us ► http://bit.ly/PatrickStewartS The epic journey of a refugee cat ► http://bit.ly/KunkuzCat Guardian playlists: Guardian Bertha Documentaries ► http://bit.ly/GuardianBertha In my opinion ► http://bit.ly/InMyOpinion Owen Jones meets ► http://bit.ly/CorbynJones US elections 2016 ► http://bit.ly/elections2016gdn Guardian Animations & Explanations ►http://is.gd/explainers Guardian Investigations ► http://is.gd/guardianinvestigations The Guardian's YouTube channels: Owen Jones talks ► http://bit.ly/subsowenjones Guardian Football ► http://is.gd/guardianfootball Guardian Science and Tech ► http://is.gd/guardiantech Guardian Culture ► http://is.gd/guardianculture Guardian Wires ► http://is.gd/guardianwires
Line 3 Construction Site 378 Shut Down
03:08

Line 3 Construction Site 378 Shut Down

Role: Director/DP/Editor - a one day flip. November 15th 2017 Water Protectors Shut Down Wisconsin Line 3 Construction and Warn Enbridge to “Stay Out of Minnesota” Early Wednesday morning water protectors from Camp Makwa stormed an Enbridge construction site, and delayed progress on the last unfinished Wisconsin segment of their proposed line 3 pipeline project. One individual from the Diné Nation descended into the muddy trench, climbed onto the pipe, and locked himself to welding equipment. A Leech Lake Tribal member then climbed atop an excavator and attached himself to a hydraulic arm. Construction was halted for approximately six hours, costing the company thousands of dollars, as the individuals put their bodies on the line to protect the water and the futures of their children. Later in the day two more water protectors were arrested, while standing on the side of the public road. They were both tackled to the ground by Sergeant Kirchhoff of the Superior Police Department. For one of the arrests, when asked on what grounds he was acting, officer Kirchhoff cited a warrant that he could not produce. Later investigation found that the warrant he cited was unsigned and improperly filed. Last Week Sergeant Kirchhoff received media attention for tackling a woman to the ground without warning at a similar protest. The woman's charges were later dropped. The Enbridge Line 3 Replacement Project is estimated to carry almost one million barrels of tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada to Superior, Wisconsin; Enbridge has received approval in Wisconsin, but has not received approval in Minnesota, which would be the largest segment of the proposed project. The non-violent direct action came after a week of evidentiary hearings in Minnesota, where Enbridge revealed that it had already paid for 100% of the pipe for the project. The same day as the action it was discovered that before her time in public office Judge Ann C O’Reilly, the individual in charge of holding public hearings on the Line 3 Project, worked for a firm that represented oil companies on multiple occasions. One water protector stated “Enbridge doesn’t have their permits for Minnesota and they have already started chopping trees down for their easement and filling its pipe storage yards. We went to the public hearings and found them full to the brim with Enbridge employees who were paid to be there. We fought again and again just to have 3 minutes to speak. Now we watch as truck after truck come into our communities carrying pipes and out of state pipeline workers. We made our comments, but they didn’t listen. The project is already bringing violence to our land and our women and children. We know that with these man camps comes increased levels of drugs, rape, and missing and murdered indigenous women. Enbridge will not take no for an answer so we have to stop them. We want to make clear in no uncertain terms, Enbridge is not welcome in Minnesota.” Donate to Camp Makwa- Camp Supplies: youcaring.com/makwacampsupplies Legal Fund: youcaring.com/makwalegal #waterislife #stopline3 #noline3 #wildriceislife #keepitintheground #lovewaternotoil #honorthetreaties #defendthesacred
Family Protection
05:24

CLIENTS / WORK WITH

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